WHAT IS THE PROBLEM WITH THE CURRENT SURVEYS?

Traditional Surveys

Traditional Surveys

End of Semester

End of Semester

Traditional surveys are submitted at the end of the semester when “what is done is done” and nothing is going to change for the students. This fact makes the students less likely to provide feedback as what they say will not affect their own learning.

Long and Boring

Long and Boring

Students perceive the feedback forms as time-consuming as they usually take 5-10 minutes to be completed. In addition, the surveys generally use Likert scales (Agree-Disagree) or rating scales which make them very standard and do not help the students answer accurately.

Mood Factor

Mood Factor

As the students answer only one time, the mood plays a big role in the accuracy of the survey. The mood can be affected by multiple factors; for instance, someone can simply wake up on the wrong side of the bed, have deadlines, have an exam close to the date of the survey, or other factors such as the weather can drastically influence the students in how they are feeling in the moment they reply to the survey.

Anchoring Effect

Anchoring Effect

As the survey is submitted at the end of the semester, it’s hard for the students to remember what happened during the whole semester, so the evaluation will be based on the most positive or negative events. In addition, too much time passed between the time the classed are conducted to the time the students answer the survey and as each student is different it becomes difficult to compare the results as everyone will focus on different events.

Unstructured

Unstructured

In organizations, very often there is an evaluation office or person responsible to collect, compile and send the report to the professors, program managers, directors, and so on. In addition, students rarely receive a constructive report of their learning process which decreases their interest in providing the feedback. Finally, the content of the survey is often not focused on teaching activities, rather on administrative information.

Time-Consuming

Time-Consuming

It takes time to prepare the surveys, to send them to the students (often done via email), collect the answer, analyze and compile the responses, send the report back to the professors (or rest of the organization). In other words, the results are not immediately available and not continuously updated.

Continuous Feedback

Continuous Feedback

Edu Enhancement constantly assesses students’ drivers of motivation and provides updated dashboards to all its users throughout the semester so that if something is not working well, the professors or the administration can act proactively and enhance the learning experience of the students.

Quick and Engaging

Quick and Engaging

Students receive a notification to provide feedback at the end of the class. The input only requires 80 seconds to be provided. In addition, the questions used to assess the several factors of students’ motivation are hypothetical projective questions, meaning they are statements in which the students can recognize themselves and self-reflect on their answers.

Immediate Feedback

Immediate Feedback

Collecting the feedback right after class leverages off the mood effect. In addition, the hypothetical questions used in Edu Enhancement are designed to make the assessment as objective as possible.

Multiple Assessments

Multiple Assessments

By answering at the end of the class instead of the semester, the students can focus on just-in-time feedback. The result would then show a trend of how the different pillars of motivation change and this allows the students, professors, and the administration to be aware of the learning journey.

Capillary System

Capillary System

Students, professors, and each level of an organization will have their personalized dashboards continuously and immediately updated. Each school, department, program will be able to see the courses they manage.

Automatic System

Automatic System

Edu Enhancement system is designed to be fully automatic: students receive a notification to provide feedback which in a matter of seconds is analyzed and displayed in everyone dedicated dashboards. If necessary, the professor and the administration can create customized surveys for their students.

WHAT IS THE UNDERLINING CONDITION?

The student’s learning performance is affected by three main factors:

Mindset, Motivation, and Social Environment.

Diagram student's learning performance

Student’s Mindset

A student’s mindset tells you how they deal with failure and success in a learning environment, and reflects the image they have of their own learning potential. It describes their understanding of what it means to learn and is, therefore, a great influence on their motivation and the habits they will develop for further learning.

Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck discerns two main types of student mindset: growth and fixed. Students with a fixed mindset believe that people’s intelligence and abilities are constant, while those with a growth mindset know that these can be changed and improved. When facing difficulties, the former will typically interpret the struggle as a sign of their limited capabilities, while the latter will view failure as a learning opportunity and a stepping-stone to a next attempt.

However, a study in 2010 found that new habits took an average of 66 days, but the range was 18 to 254 days. So, this time frame is too long to be affected by a single course.

Student’s Motivation

The main focus in school is given to the external factors of student’s motivation such as grades, recognition, diploma, and career. They certainly motivate students, but they incentivise a short-term think and retention of the material, higher level of stress, and unhealthy competition.

On the other spectrum of motivation, we have intrinsic rewards such as personal and professional development, learning progress, autonomy, balance between skills and challenges, trust in the professor, and many more.

Intrinsically motivated students study and enjoy learning for their own personal satisfaction, and this is long-lasting and self-sustaining.

In one sentence:

Students engage in a behaviour because it is personally rewarding, not for an external reward.

Social Environment

The social context refers to the way a classroom environment influences or supports the interactions that occur among students, teachers, the structure of the school, and family members. A well-designed social environment helps foster positive peer relationships, creates positive interactions between people, and provides opportunities for professors to support students to achieve their goals.

However, the students can hardly affect the social environment and the only thing they can do so is changing school, but this is a drastic change that can harm the students’ self-esteem. So, this is an element that the professor and the school can hardly realise without having quantifiable data on students’ intrinsic motivation.

Pillars of Motivation